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Balancing Blood Sugar Levels with Whole grains

July 11, 2013 2:55 pm
posted by Lucy

Eating excessive amounts of refined and simple carbohydrates can disrupt our blood sugar levels on an ongoing basis. Examples include white flour foods such as croissants, muffins, white bread, along with white rice and pasta.

However, whole grain carbohydrates, such as brown rice, wholegrain or wholewheat bread, wholewheat pasta, wholegrain oats and rye etc can be consumed safety if eaten in the correct portion.

Remember that whole grain carbohydrates are packed full of essential vitamins and minerals and are considered a good source of fibre.

The general principles that apply to eating whole grains and blood sugar control are as follows:

  • Two-thirds of a cup of cooked 100% whole grains (such as cooked oats or brown rice) is a generally safe amount at any one meal.
  • A slice of 100% whole-grain bread can vary dramatically in terms of how much wholegrain flour used. Aim for the brownest breads possible.  2 small-to-medium single slices of bread may be an equivalently safe amount.
  • Combining your whole grains with a small amount of some protein-rich food (for example, a small serving of fish, beans, nuts, or seeds) can often be helpful in blood sugar regulation.
  • Be careful not to over consume grains  - its easy.  When you look at your plate, about a quarter of the plate should be whole grains or other carbohydrate (for example 2 small new potatoes or one medium potato)

Eating your whole grains carbohydrates are essential to keeping your energy levels constant throughout the day so enjoy in moderation and you'll keep going all day!

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